Category Archives: Beth Welch

Technical Training: Invest NOW or Watch Another Year Pass By

Do not let 2015 pass you by without investing just a few days to get your field technicians and sales engineers up to speed on new fire alarm technologies – many of which are code-mandated in most jurisdictions. I’m talking about carbon monoxide detection, low frequency notification, emergency communications, and back-up power – just to name a few. These are all covered in Silent Knight’s Tech Ed Course.Training generic

A new schedule of trainings taking place in 25+ states from now through the end of 2015 has been posted and online registration is open! Due to the detailed, hands-on instruction of these courses, class sizes are limited, so find a location near you and make a plan to invest in your employees’ education. Don’t let another year pass you by!

About the Author
Beth Welch is the Manager of Public Relations & Social Outreach for Honeywell Fire Systems. For a decade, she has strived to raise awareness of new technologies, industry trends and information, for the benefit of engineers, integrators and end users.

ISC West – A Focus on Code and Specifier Demands

Carbon monoxide detection, low frequency notification and back-up power for ISC West Booth19emergency communication, mixed with some time- and money-saving options was a primary focus for Silent Knight at the 2015 ISC West Show in Las Vegas, NV.

Dealers and integrators at the show appeared very interested in the new line of low frequency sounders and sounder bases, including the new B200S-LF base that fits the SK-FIRE-CO detector. Current versions of PR_SystemSensor_LowFrequency_imageSilent Knight detectors and traditional sounder bases used in existing installations can be easily upgraded by replacing the base with the new low frequency version.

In applications where speakers are being used for low frequency notification, the IntelliKnight 5820XL-EVS has also been updated to emit the 520 Hz tone. A growing number of jurisdictions are adopting codes that mandate low frequency notification for numerous occupancy types – Silent Knight wants to be sure you’re equipped to meet those requirements.

An increasing number of fire alarm specs are calling for back-up amps to meet voice evac. and emergency communication systems survivability requirements. Many attendees were not aware of that Silent Knight now offers the EVS-100W to provide ????????unique backup power capabilities for the IntelliKnight 5820XL-EVS emergency voice system. At ISC West, we demonstrated the three ways in which this new amp can be used:

  • 50 watts with 50 watts as backup
  • 100 watt single channel
  • 100 watt single channel with 50 watts backup using the EVS-100WBU

Did you stop by our booth at ISC West? C’mon, give us some feedback in the comments below – what should we show or demonstration at ISC West 2016?

About the Author
Beth Welch is the Manager of Public Relations & Social Outreach for Honeywell Fire Systems. For a decade, she has strived to raise awareness of new technologies, industry trends and information, for the benefit of engineers, integrators and end users.

NFPA Standards New and Old – Which Do YOU Follow?

Earlier this year, I asked a LinkedIn Group of industry pros a simple question about the NFPA standards their regions were currently following. To this day, I have NEVER seen such a fury of comments on any other subject!old new sign

Some talked about the hurdles new standards presented. Others were infuriated with how long they’ve followed the same, antiquated standards. A few discussed how they capitalized on new standards. And those examples are just the tip of the ice berg.

So a new year is upon us, and I wonder… has anything changed? Let’s find out.

With the help of colleagues, I devised a quick quiz on this topic – click here to take the survey and you will see the current survey results at the completion of your survey.

If you’re hesitant to click on the survey link above, here’s a quick overview of the survey questions:

1. In what state or U.S. territory is most of your business located? (multiple choice)

2. What version of NFPA 72 is your region currently following? (multiple choice)

3. If your region has not yet adopted the current 2013 version of NFPA 72, how long before you believe it will be adopted? (multiple choice)

4. Once a new version of NFPA 72 is introduced (every three years), how long does it generally take before your region adopts the new standard? (multiple choice)

5. What’s the biggest challenge you’ve experienced or foresee with the adoption of the current NFPA 2013 standards? (open comment)

6. What’s the biggest business opportunity you’ve experienced or foresee with the adoption of the current NFPA 2013 standards? (open comment)

Take the Poll

 

About the Author
Beth Welch is the Manager of Public Relations & Social Outreach for Honeywell Fire Systems. For a decade, she has strived to raise awareness of new technologies, industry trends and information, for the benefit of engineers, integrators and end users.

 

Do You Understand the Division Between Engineers and Designers?

Why is fire protection engineering so important? Why is it essential that the life-safety systems are designed, installed and tested by qualified people who truly know and understand the code? For Jack Poole, principal at Poole Fire Protection, Inc., the answers lay in the numbers.

“With more than 3,000 people dying, more than 18,000 people injured and $10 billion in property damage each year from fires, that’s what [fire protection] is all about,” Poole said during a Sept. 16 Silent Knight webinar titled “Role and Responsibility of the Engineer vs. the Designer.” “We’re in this business to save lives and protect property, and there are lots of ways we do that.”

“As the community continues to struggle with a number of firefighter deaths, fire protection engineers are involved in making buildings safer,” Poole added. “We’re here to protect the safety and the welfare of the public from fire hazards.”two solutions

While engineers play a critical role in the fire protection industry, designers also play a part when it comes to fire alarms and mass notification systems. Participants left the webinar with an enhanced understanding of the separate responsibilities of the two professions. For instance, fire protection engineers evaluate the broad range of hazards and protection schemes required to develop a workable, integrated solution to a fire safety problem, while designers prepare drawings and material submittals based on the engineer’s design.

“From a fire alarm perspective, the fire protection engineer sets the criteria for the fire detection system—whether the fire alarm will be a manual or automatic system, how to sound the speakers or horns, whether there will be strobe lights or laser beam detectors,” said Poole, PE, FSFPE. “Now once that criteria is set, then the designer can pick up the fire alarm criteria and do the shop drawings.”

Here’s a bit more on the distinct roles:

Design and Layout Stages: When setting the design parameters for the system, the engineer takes into account how fires spark and grow; how smoke moves throughout a building; how many exits there are in a building; and numerous other factors. After the engineer prepares the criteria documents, the designer develops the shop drawings according to the engineer’s design. The engineer will review the designer’s drawings and it’s the engineer’s responsibility to make sure the shop drawings are consistent with the initial design parameters for the system.

Installation and Testing Stages: Subsequently, the engineer will monitor the system’s installation to make sure the right types of materials are being utilized, ensuring installation is consistent with the design’s intent. Once the system is installed at the end of the job, the engineer needs to be present to witness final acceptance testing and commissioning of the system to make sure it truly works as designed and intended, according to Poole, who has served as project manager, project engineer and lead fire protection engineer on projects for public and private sector clients.

Liability Insurance Significance: Moreover, it’s critical that engineers understand the liability and responsibility in the fire protection industry. For instance, if a resident passes away in a fire because a smoke detector could not be located properly, the engineer would be held liable, which is why engineers must obtain professional liability insurance.

The webinar is now viewable on demand on the Silent Knight website. Click here to learn more about the roles and responsibilities of the engineer and designer.

 

About the Author
Beth Welch is the Manager of Public Relations and Social Engagement for Honeywell Fire Systems. For a decade, she has strived to raise awareness of new technologies, industry trends and information, for the benefit of engineers, integrators and end users.

Fire Alarm NICET Certification Defined (130 Words)

The National Institute for Certification in Engineering Technologies (NICET) offers a specific certification program for those who work in the fire alarm industry. There are four levels of fire alarm certification.

The certification program covers numerous areas including types of fire-alarm detectors and signaling systems, applicable codes and standards, training and development keyboard keysupervision/power requirements, safety considerations and system troubleshooting. The more technical areas involved with certification, include properly mounting and connecting a fire alarm system, practicing proper wiring methods, troubleshooting and repairing system faults, and mitigating work-site safety hazards.

The computer-based NICET exams are offered regularly in locations throughout the U.S. To help you prepare, a list of reference materials is available online and don’t miss the 10 Steps to NICET Success Webinar on November 18, 2014, viewable on-demand after that date.

Beth Welch is the Manager of Public Relations and Social Engagement for Honeywell Fire Systems. For a decade, she has strived to raise awareness of new technologies, industry trends and information, for the benefit of engineers, integrators and end users.