Category Archives: Mark Indgjer

SBUS Fiber Optic Revisited: FAQs

sbus_webinar_screenI conducted a webinar on November 16, 2015, titled Powerful and Simple! Flexible Design with SBUS and Fiber Optic to provide an overview of the Silent Knight addressable SBUS devices and how they provide flexibility for a variety of applications. I also presented the SK-F485C SBUS to Fiber Optic converter. This product provides a solution to the high risk of lightning damage and ground faults that often occur with wire runs between buildings.

Thank you for those who were able to attend this webinar. There were excellent questions and comments and I would like to address some of them in this blog:

  • A popular question centered on cascade and daisy-chain wiring of multiple SBUS devices. SBUS devices are addressable and provide flexible wiring configurations. Daisy chain, T-Tapping, and Home Run wire configurations are all acceptable methods. The fire alarm control panel will properly annunciate and report trouble events if there is a wire break with any of these methods.
  • Another popular question related to wire type and distances. Specifications call out for wire to be from 14 AWG to 22 AWG with a possible distance up to 6,000 feet. Wire can be of any type that meets NEC 760 fire power limited fire protective signaling cable.
  • Lastly, questions and observations arose about the specifications of the fiber optic cable. The SK-F485C uses 62.5 micron multi mode fiber optic cable at 115.2K bits/second. Fiber connections are ST connectors and the cable distance is up to 1 mile (5,280 feet).

If you have any questions or need assistance with an application, please contact the Silent Knight Applications department at 1-800-446-6444 or Jack.Grones@Honeywell.com.

Do you know that you can download and view this and other previously held Silent Knight webinars? Click here to access our webinar library page.

 

About the Author
Mark Indgjer is a Product Marketing Manager with Silent Knight.  Mark joined Silent Knight in 1988 and is responsible for new product development, product marketing and much more.  Mark is also NICET Level II certified.​

Internally Speaking: Applications Using the EVS-INT50W

I wrote a blog in May 2015 introducing our new EVS-INT50W internal amplifier. An overview of the product was provided along with a brief mention of applications. In this installment, I would like to discuss a few specific applications: Day Care Centers, Assembly Occupancies, K – 12 Educational Facilities, and Lodging.

evs-int50w-diagram1Day Care Centers is an ideal application for the internal amplifier because of limited wall space for mounting external hardware and the requirement for the 520Hz low frequency output. Many jurisdictions are adopting the 2012 edition of the International Building Code (IBC) which states that a manual fire alarm system that initiates the occupant notification signal utilizing an emergency voice/alarm communication system shall be installed in Group E occupancies.  Day Care facilities fall under a Group E occupancy. In addition, Section 18 of the 2013 edition of NFPA 72 states that effective January 1st, 2014, audible appliances provided for the sleeping areas to awaken occupants shall produce a low frequency alarm signal.

As defined by NFPA 101, an Assembly Occupancy is an occupancy used for a gathering of 50 or more persons for deliberation, worship, entertainment, eating, drinking, amusement, awaiting transportation, or similar uses. A common example of an assembly occupancy is a place of worship where the area of congregation will require voice evacuation. The EVS-INT50W is perfect for this application because vital wall space is saved while providing a 50 watt single speaker circuit amplifier that meets required decibel output and audibility requirements

K – 12 Educational Facilities offer the ability to use the internal amplifier with the flexibility of integrating distributed amplifiers. As with the Day Care Center application, K through 12 educational facilities fall under a Group E occupancy. Since many classrooms and other gathering locations will have an occupant load of greater than 30 people, these facilities are prime candidates for voice evacuation and emergency communications. The 5820XL-EVS and the EVS-INT50W will cover an area or areas of the facility while distributed amplifiers will cover other areas of the facility. This is quickly becoming a popular method of distributing voice.

evs-int50w-diagram2Due to recent code updates and state/local legislation, low frequency is becoming common in the lodging industry. Section 18 of the 2013 edition of NFPA 72 states that effective January 1st, 2014, audible appliances provided for the sleeping areas to awaken occupants shall produce a low frequency alarm signal. Full coverage for low frequency voice evacuation can be accomplished by using a combination of the internal amplifiers and the distributed EVS-100W amplifiers. As with the K – 12 Educational Facilities application, the 5820XL-EVS and the EVS-INT50W will cover an area or areas of the lodging facility while the distributed EVS-100W will cover other areas of the facility.

Do you have applications where the EVS-INT50W would be helpful? Please let us know by clicking on the Leave a Reply link above to enter your request.  Click here to download the EVS-INT50W data sheet.

 

About the Author
Mark Indgjer is a Product Marketing Manager with Silent Knight.  Mark joined Silent Knight in 1988 and is responsible for new product development, product marketing and much more.  Mark is also NICET Level II certified.​

Reducing Fire Alarm System Vulnerability with Fiber Optics

Since we are in the heart of lightning season, I would like to visit a topic that has been discussed in the past – fire alarm system vulnerability. Electrical surges and ground faults due to storms can wreak havoc on fire alarm systems, especially multi building installations using copper wire.

Fortunately, there is an option available to assist in alleviating these vulnerabilities: fiber optic cable. Because fiber optic cabling uses glass or plastic strands, there is no need for grounding. Since grounding is no longer required, electrical surges and ground faults are virtually eliminated because there are no earth ground differentials.

Silent Knight offers a solution using the SK-F485C fiber optic converter. This device converts the SBUS copper run to fiber optic. The diagram below illustrates how the conversion is accomplished linking the fire alarm panel to a distributed addressable power supply. It is important to note that the SK-F485C is U.L. listed with the IntelliKnight line of addressable fire alarm panels.fiber conversion

 

When using the SK-F485C, please keep in mind required fiber optic specifications:

  • Duplex ST connectors for the TX and RX connections
  • 62.5 microns
  • Multimode
  • Data rate = 115.2K byte/second
  • Maximum attenuation of 5.5db

Do you have installations where the SK-F485C would be helpful? Need applications and support assistance? Let us know in the comments section below! Click here to download the SK-F485C data sheet.

 

About the Author
Mark Indgjer is a Product Marketing Manager with Silent Knight.  Mark joined Silent Knight in 1988 and is responsible for new product development, product marketing and much more.  Mark is also NICET Level II certified.​

You Have The Power – B200S Series Auxiliary Power Requirements

The use of sounder bases in applications such as apartments, hotels and dormitories provide a flexible and efficient means of required audible notification. The ability to activate the sounder bases in the affected area or for general alarm makes these bases an effective audible option.

The Silent Knight B200S and B200S-LF sounder bases are used with the addressable SK series of detectors. These bases require a total of 4 conductors: 2 for the SLC (Signaling Line Circuit) and 2 for constant 24 VDC auxiliary power.sounders

A distinct advantage of the B200S series sounder bases is the supervision of the constant 24 VDC auxiliary power.  Previous versions of the sounder base did not supervise 24 VDC power at the base and required an End of Line relay module along with an addressable contact input module.  If 24 VDC power was lost, the End of Line relay module would open, thus creating a trouble on the contact input module. The B200S and B200S-LF supervise the power at the base, eliminating the need for an End of Line relay module and a contact input module. Since these bases take on the address of the detector, additional addresses are not required. If the power is lost, the affected detectors will indicate a Missing Base trouble. Supervision at each base also provides huge benefits by allowing the 24 VDC power circuit to be T-Tapped or Home Run from the source. Bases that require an End of Line relay module for supervision cannot be T-Tapped or Home Run.

The Silent Knight addressable fire alarm control panel provides a standard 24 VDC constant auxiliary power option or 24 VDC constant Sounder Base Sync option. The Sounder Base Sync option outputs a sync pulse that allows all B200S and/or B200S-LF bases to synchronize when activated.

The B200S-LF is a low frequency sounder base that provides a 520 Hz output required by code for sleeping areas.

Have a question on where or when to use certain sounder bases? Have a specific question on programming? Enter questions and comments in the comments section below.

About the Author
Mark Indgjer is a Product Marketing Manager with Silent Knight.  Mark joined Silent Knight in 1988 and is responsible for new product development, product marketing and much more.  Mark is also NICET Level II certified.​

16-Digit Reporting Makes Life Easier

Our dealers spoke and we listened. Today, we are excited to announce that we have released a new version of the IPGSM-4G—Honeywell’s simple to install, dual path communicator—that will make everyone’s lives a little easier.digits

Prior to Firmware Version 3.0.2, the Contact ID reporting format was set in a 15-digit architecture. By reporting 15 digits, central stations would run into a problem identifying module IDs on the fire alarm system because the IPGSM-4G would only report the last digit of the two-digit module ID number. The new version now allows for 16-digit Contact ID reporting, effectively correcting the anomaly.

As an example, the fire alarm control panel SLC loop is set as module 33. An SBUS device, such as a point expander, is added to the system and addressed as 13. When a device activated on module 33 and communicated using previous versions of the IPGSM-4G, it reported the module as a 3. You weren’t sure if the module reporting was 3, 13, 23, or 33.

With the new Firmware version 3.0.2, this issue has been corrected as both digits of all Silent Knight addressable fire alarm control panel SBUS addresses 01-34 will now fully report to the central station. This eliminates the need for dealers to work around the issue by creating unique ideas for each device on the system loop and removes guess work in reporting.

As a dual path communicator, the IPGSM-4G has the ability to report to the central station via IP or cellular communication, eliminating the cost of two dedicated phone lines. It’s cellular function works over 2G, 3G and 4G networks and will switch between the three based on best available signal, maintaining critical connections even in the face of a natural disaster, for instance, where cell towers might be jammed. Furthermore, because the IPGSM-4G is classified under Other Transmission Technologies it fully complies with NFPA 72 requirements.

If you’re unsure of what firmware your IPGSM-4G is running on, locate the box label that will have the Firmware version documented within.

To learn more about the IPGSM-4G system, download the data sheet here.

About the Author
Mark Indgjer is a Product Marketing Manager with Silent Knight.  Mark joined Silent Knight in 1988 and is responsible for new product development, product marketing and much more.  Mark is also NICET Level II certified.​