Category Archives: Rebecca Peterson

What are the New Sleeping Space Requirements in NFPA 72?

A significant change in the sleeping space requirements within NFPA 72:2010 and 2013 went into effect on January 1, 2014.  hotel room

The new sleeping space requirements require the alarm tone of audible appliances to be of a square wave tone centered around 520Hz – click here to hear a sample 520Hz tone.

NFPA 72 chapters impacted and placement requirements:

Chapter 18, defines the requirements for Protected Premise Fire Alarm Systems

  • Required in every sleeping space

Chapter 24, defines the requirements for Emergency Communication Systems

  • Required for voice systems in sleeping spaces

Chapter 29, defines the requirements for Household Fire Alarm Systems

  • Required only in sleeping spaces for those classified as having mild-to-severe hearing loss, where governed by law or code, or volunteered to provide a means for such individuals.

What does this change mean for you? If you are designing a new commercial building with sleeping rooms – such as a hotel or a college dormitory – then you may be required to comply with the new low frequency requirements.

Silent Knight now offers UL-listed low frequency sounders from System Sensor. To learn more about the code requirements and System Sensor low frequency (520 Hz) devices, please visit: www.systemsensor.com/LF

Rebecca Peterson is the Product Marketing Manager for the AV business unit of System Sensor. Rebecca has been with System Sensor for 13 years and her primary focus is designing products that customers need and want.

Low Frequency Sleeping Space Requirements Impacting 2012 IBC/IFC

When it comes to the hierarchy of code changes, the foundation lies with the International Building Code and Fire Code before any new changes will get implemented and enforced.

The 2012 editions of the International Building Code (IBC) and International Fire Code (IFC) indirectly reference the 2010 edition of NFPA 72, which requires a low freq maplow frequency tone in certain newly constructed Group-R occupancies.

Applications Impacted:

  • Transient Lodging Spaces – Hotels/Motels
  • College and University Dormitories
  • Assisted Living Facilities
  • Apartments and Condominiums

Each application – hotel and motel guest rooms, dorms, and so on – requires a careful study to determine the suitability of systems to meet associated codes.  Depending on your occupancy or system type, you may be required to use the low frequency notification appliances in either all sleeping spaces or just certain sleeping rooms.

Not every local jurisdiction has adopted the 2010 or 2013 version of NFPA 72, but an
increasing number of jurisdictions have. Remember to follow manufacturer instructions, as well as your local building/code regulations, for the use and installation of any audible visible notification devices.

To find out if your state or region will be required to comply with the low frequency requirements or to learn more about System Sensor SpectrAlert Advance Low Frequency (520Hz) devices, visit: www.systemsensor.com/lf

Rebecca Peterson is the Product Marketing Manager for the AV business unit of System Sensor. Rebecca has been with System Sensor for 13 years and her primary focus is designing products that customers need and want.

What are Low-Frequency Sounders?

SpectrAlert® Advance Low Frequency Sounders and Sounder Strobesare the first UL-listed low frequency(520 Hz) notification appliances to meet the NFPA 72®2010/2013 requirements for new sleeping spaces. These devices were designed to easily integrate into new or existing panels’ notification appliance circuit (NAC) line and provide the required audibility and square wave tone to awaken individuals.Spectra Alert low freq sounders

The low frequency (520 Hz) sounders come with three field-selectable tones (T3, continuous, coded) and are compatible with 12 and 24 VDC/FWR Systems. Model Numbers are HR-LF and HW-LF.

The low frequency (520 Hz) sounder strobes feature our high-candela range (135, 150, 177, and 185 cd) and two field-selectable tones (T3 and continuous), and they are compatible with 24 VDC/FWR systems. Model Numbers are P2RH-LF and P2WH-LF.

Like the entire SpectrAlert Advance product line, low frequency sounder and sounder strobe devices increase application versatility while simplifying installation. Enabled with our System Sensor synchronization protocol, you can interconnect them with our non-low frequency sounders to provide synchronization throughout the notification zone.

To learn more about the SpectrAlert Advance low frequency (520Hz) devices, visit: www.systemsensor.com/LF

Rebecca Peterson is the Product Marketing Manager for the AV business unit of System Sensor. Rebecca has been with System Sensor for 13 years and her primary focus is designing products that customers need and want.

The Importance of Low Frequency (520 Hz) – in 150 Words

​In a fire event, we’ve been trained to evacuate the building when all of the horns and horn/strobes in the building go off.  In an ideal situation you respond as soon as the audible device sounds, but what happens if you’re in a deep sleep? Will you react right away?

The NFPA 72 committee, in partnership with the FRPF, conducted studies on audible devices with a square wave tone and a lower frequency (520 Hz). The results may surprise you: low frequency tones were more effective at waking sleeping individuals, including those with mild-to-severe hearing loss and those under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

The studies also concluded that certain high-risk groups – such as hearing impaired individuals, those under the influence of drugs or alcohol, and deep sleepers – had a delayed response to the 3 kilohertz tone found in many smoke alarms and audible devices in the US market.


 

To learn more about the benefit of the low frequency sounders, visit our archived webinar: http://systemsensor.com/en-us/res/pages/Video.aspx?videoID=57

 

 

About the Author
Rebecca Peterson is the Product Marketing Manager for the AV business unit of System Sensor. Rebecca has been with System Sensor for 13 years and her primary focus is designing products that customers need and want.​